Monthly archives:November 2017

  • ST. FELIX was son of the Count of Valois. His mother throughout his youth did all she could to cultivate in him a spirit of charity. The unjust divorce between his parents matured a long-formed resolution of leaving the world; and, confiding his mother to her pious brother, Thibault, Count of Cham[...]
  • The Happiness of Purgatory The happiness of Purgatory is a happiness of prospect, not of actual enjoyment. It is in spe and not in re; hoped for, not already possessed. But the hope is something more than hope, it is a certain expectation which the Holy Souls know cannot be disappointed. This is [...]
  • November 19—St. Elizabeth of Hungary ELIZABETH was daughter of a king of Hungary, and niece of St. Hedwige. She was betrothed in infancy to Louis, Landgrave of Thuringia, and brought up in his father's court. Not content with receiving daily numbers of poor in her palace, and relieving all in d[...]
  • Our Friends and Acquaintances Purgatory Of all those with whom we have been connected by some tie of friendship or affection, of companionship, or common occupation, or business, how many there must be who are now in Purgatory! Most of them have some sort of claim on us. Some have been entrusted [...]
  • On Christmas-eve, 877, a noble of Aquitaine implored Our Lady to grant him a son. His prayer was heard; Odo was born, and his grateful father offered him to St. Martin. Odo grew in wisdom and in virtue, and his father longed to see him shine at court. But the attraction of grace was too strong. Od[...]
  • Our Kinsfolk in Purgatory Most of us have some who are related to us by blood still suffering in the Purgatorial fire, father or mother, brother or sister, some other kinsmen perhaps more closely connected with us. All these have a special claim upon us. They are bone of our bone and fles[...]
  • St. Gregory was born in Pontus, of heathen parents. In Palestine, about the year 231, he studied philosophy under the great Origen, who led him from the pursuit of human wisdom to Christ, Who is the Wisdom of God. Not long after, he was made Bishop of Neo Cæsarea in his own country. As he lay awak[...]
  • The Degrees of Pain in Purgatory The pain of sense and the pain of loss have each of them an almost indefinite number of degrees. The pain of sense varies in proportion to the indulgence of the senses on earth, and the knowledge possessed of the sinfulness of this indulgence. All the advantages a[...]
  • St. Edmund left his home at Abingdon, a boy of twelve years old, to study at Oxford, and there protected himself against many grievous temptations by a vow of chastity, and by espousing himself to Mary for life. He was soon called to active public life, and as treasurer of the diocese of Salisbury[...]
  • The Pain of Loss in Purgatory The pain of loss arises from the separation to the Holy Souls from God. In losing God, they lose everything that can satisfy the higher faculties of the soul. For one instant they have seen face to face the glory of God as reflected in the Sacred Humanity of Jesus [...]